About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
of the kingdom. and it's this kind of, you know, "don't slow me down with the facts" impatience and energy that we get in paul's letters. >> paul's very first letter-- the earliest single writing that we have in the newestament-- is i thessalonians, and already in i thessalonians paul is having to console them when people are starting to die within the congregation and the kingdom hasn't arrived yet. >> narrator: paul believed the earthly world order was about to change, that time was running out, and the end was at hand. >> clearly the... the message about the... the coming end time was the part that would have been threatening to a roman official, and would have been threatening to any native population that had vested some authority in roman officialdom. >> narrator: paul attacked those who preferred peace and security to the coming kingdom of god. >> ( dramatized ): when they say, "there is peace and security," then sudden destruction will come upon them. >> scholars have wondered who this people is who are saying "peace and security." some interpreters think that it's the first lapsed
basically take photons and hit a sensor that would turn the photon impulses, the energy of the photons, instead of hitting film, would hit a sensor, and instead of a chemical reaction happening, you would basically get ones and zeros you'd get a value for a color, red, green, or blue. so we're just kind of talking about here's some light, we've got some film, and we just process it and then we'd project it and we'd watch a movie. now we're talking about sunlight hitting a sensor and going to ones and zeros into a box, and we take that box and then we project that, and now we're watching a movie. tavis: so another one of these technological advances. >> yes. tavis: you paused when you said yes, and i want to dig into that. i ask is it really a technological advance. obviously, it could be argued in some ways that it is advancing us. but is it causing challenges in other ways? >> well, it's an industry shift, so practically, it's like what is the role of the cinematographer in making a movie now? he used to be in control of the image. he was the magician. he knew how to do just dealing
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)